Home Abortion Aids & Hiv Euthanasia Homosexuality Lebanon Natural Family Planning Contact Me   
Daily News  »
Archives
Photo Album
Arabic Church News
Arabic Church Titles
Arabic Encyclopedia
Catechism of the Catholic Church
Church History
Code of Eastern Canon Law
Code of Western Canon Law
Council for Justice and Peace
Papal Documents
Papal Encyclicals
Paths of the Spirit
Pontifical Academy for Life
The 21 Ecumenical Councils
The Catholic Encyclopedia
The Encyclopedia of Philosophy
The Fathers of the Church
The Holy Father
The II Vatican Council
The List of Popes
The Mysteries of the Rosary
Way of the Cross
Question and Answer
- Faith FAQs
 
Newsletter
Your name:
   
Your email:
   
   Subscribe Unsubscribe
 
Latest Posts
- When a Crucifix Is Absent And More on Baptismal Fonts
- Liturgy Q & A: Communion by Intinction And More on Location of Tabernacles
- LITURGY Q & A: Placement of the Paschal Candle
- Holy Father Urges Youth to Join ‘Revolution of Tenderness’
- Liturgy Q & A: Location of Tabernacle
 
   
Media
- Tv Charity
- Radio Maria
- Radio Charity - Lebanon
 
Slide Shows & Movies
- Psalm 23
- Be United Against...
- You Are Mine
- Abortion
- Mother Teresa
- Promise
 
Calendar
  October 2019  
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Number Of Visitors:
475273
 
‘Today We Also Need a Mother,’ Pope Appeals to Entrust Painful Journeys of All on the Move to Mary (Full Homily)

September 29, 2019. Francis Celebrates Mass for World Day of Migrants and Refugees on Theme ‘It’s Not Only About Migrants’

“Today we also need a mother,” Pope Francis has said, appealing: “we entrust to the maternal love of Mary, Our Lady of the Way, of so many painful journeys, all migrants and refugees, together with those who live on the peripheries of our world and those who have chosen to share their journey.”

The Pontiff stressed this on the 105th World Day of Migrants and Refugees, which is observed on September 29, 2019. In his homily in St. Peter’s Square during Mass, he encouraged to “pass immediately to action to relieve, care and save” people in movement. “It’s about putting the last in the first place,” because the true motto of a Christian is “the last first!” and not “me first and the others after.”

The Pope’s theme for the day, entitled “It’s Not Only About Migrants,” stresses that in a world “every day more elitist and cruel towards the excluded,” the migrants’ cause concerns “us all,” the “present and . . . the future of the human family.”

In the Holy Father’s message, published on May 27, 2019, the Pontiff warns against the “moral decline we must watch out for, if we continue to cede ground to the culture of rejection,” and he invites “to rediscover certain essential dimensions of our Christian existence and of our humanity.” By looking after migrants, “we all grow,” he affirms.

“The problem is not so much to have doubts and fears,” says the Pontiff. “The problem is when these conditions our way of thinking and acting to the point of making us intolerant, closed and, perhaps, even . . . racists.”

“It’s not only about migrants: it’s about not excluding anyone, he continues, lamenting the exploitation of natural and human resources” for the profit of some privileged markets” and the arms trade. “Those who pay for it are always the little ones, the poor, the most vulnerable, that one impedes from sitting at the table and to whom one leaves the “crumbs” of the banquet.

Therefore, he exhorts to free oneself from “exclusions, indifference and the throw away culture” and “to make room for tenderness.”

Below is the Vatican-provided text of the Pope’s homily at the Mass:

***

Today’s Responsorial Psalm reminds us that the Lord upholds the stranger as well as the widow and the orphan among his people. The Psalmist makes explicit mention of those persons who are especially vulnerable, often forgotten and subject to oppression. The Lord has a particular concern for foreigners, widows and orphans, for they are without rights, excluded and marginalized. This is why God tells the Israelites to give them special care.

In the Book of Exodus, the Lord warns his people not to mistreat in any way widows and orphans, for he hears their cry (cf. 22:23). Deuteronomy sounds the same warning twice (cf. 24:17; 27:19), and includes strangers among this group requiring protection. The reason for that warning is explained clearly in the same book: the God of Israel is the one who “executes justice for the fatherless and the widow, and loves the sojourner, giving him food and clothing” (10:18). This loving care for the less privileged is presented as a characteristic trait of the God of Israel and is likewise required, as a moral duty, of all those who would belong to his people.

That is why we must pay special attention to the strangers in our midst as well as to widows, orphans and all the outcasts of our time. In the Message for this 105th World Day of Migrants and Refugees, the theme “It is not Just about Migrants” is repeated as a refrain. And rightly so: it is not only about foreigners; it is about all those in existential peripheries who, together with migrants and refugees, are victims of the throwaway culture. The Lord calls us to practise charity towards them. He calls us to restore their humanity, as well as our own, and to leave no one behind.

Along with the exercise of charity, the Lord also invites us to think about the injustices that cause exclusion – and in particular the privileges of the few, who, in order to preserve their status, act to the detriment of the many. “Today’s world is increasingly becoming more elitist and cruel towards the excluded”: this is a painful truth; our word is daily more and more elitist, more cruel towards the excluded. “Developing countries continue to be drained of their best natural and human resources for the benefit of a few privileged markets. Wars only affect some regions of the world, yet weapons of war are produced and sold in other regions which are then unwilling to take in the refugees generated by these conflicts. Those who pay the price are always the little ones, the poor, the most vulnerable, who are prevented from sitting at the table and are left with the ‘crumbs’ of the banquet” (Message for the 105th World Day of Migrants and Refugees).

It is in this context that the harsh words of the Prophet Amos proclaimed in the first reading (6:1.4-7) should be understood. Woe to those who are at ease and seek pleasure in Zion, who do not worry about the ruin of God’s people, even though it is in plain sight. They do not notice the destruction of Israel because they are too busy ensuring that they can still enjoy the good life, delicious food and fine drinks. It is striking how, twenty-eight centuries later, these warnings remain as timely as ever. For today too, the “culture of comfort… makes us think only of ourselves, makes us insensitive to the cries of other people… which results in indifference to others; indeed, it even leads to the globalization of indifference” (Homily in Lampedusa, 8 July 2013).

In the end, we too risk becoming like that rich man in the Gospel who is unconcerned for the poor man Lazarus, “covered with sores, who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table” (Lk16:20-21). Too intent on buying elegant clothes and organizing lavish banquets, the rich man in the parable is blind to Lazarus’s suffering. Overly concerned with preserving our own well-being, we too risk being blind to our brothers and sisters in difficulty.

Yet, as Christians, we cannot be indifferent to the tragedy of old and new forms of poverty, to the bleak isolation, contempt and discrimination experienced by those who do not belong to “our” group. We cannot remain insensitive, our hearts deadened, before the misery of so many innocent people. We must not fail to weep. We must not fail to respond. Let us ask the Lord for the grace of tears, the tears that can convert our hearts before such sins.

If we want to be men and women of God, as Saint Paul urges Timothy, we must “keep the commandment unstained and free from reproach until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1Tm6:14). The commandment is to love God and love our neighbour; the two cannot be separated! Loving our neighbour as ourselves means being firmly committed to building a more just world, in which everyone has access to the goods of the earth, in which all can develop as individuals and as families, and in which fundamental rights and dignity are guaranteed to all.

Loving our neighbour means feeling compassion for the sufferings of our brothers and sisters, drawing close to them, touching their sores and sharing their stories, and thus manifesting concretely God’s tender love for them. This means being a neighbour to all those who are mistreated and abandoned on the streets of our world, soothing their wounds and bringing them to the nearest shelter, where their needs can be met.

God gave this holy commandment to his people and sealed it with the blood of his Son Jesus, to be a source of blessing for all mankind. So that all together we can work to build the human family according to his original plan, revealed in Jesus Christ: all are brothers and sisters, all are sons and daughters of the same Father.

Today we also need a mother. So we entrust to the maternal love of Mary, Our Lady of the Way, of so many painful journeys, all migrants and refugees, together with those who live on the peripheries of our world and those who have chosen to share their journey.

[Vatican-provided English text]