Home Abortion Aids & Hiv Euthanasia Homosexuality Lebanon Natural Family Planning Contact Me   
Daily News  »
Archives
Photo Album
Arabic Church News
Arabic Church Titles
Arabic Encyclopedia
Catechism of the Catholic Church
Church History
Code of Eastern Canon Law
Code of Western Canon Law
Council for Justice and Peace
Papal Documents
Papal Encyclicals
Paths of the Spirit
Pontifical Academy for Life
The 21 Ecumenical Councils
The Catholic Encyclopedia
The Encyclopedia of Philosophy
The Fathers of the Church
The Holy Father
The II Vatican Council
The List of Popes
The Mysteries of the Rosary
Way of the Cross
Question and Answer
- Faith FAQs
 
Newsletter
Your name:
   
Your email:
   
   Subscribe Unsubscribe
 
Latest Posts
- Extraordinary Ministers’ Limits
- When a Crucifix Is Absent And More on Baptismal Fonts
- Liturgy Q & A: Communion by Intinction And More on Location of Tabernacles
- LITURGY Q & A: Placement of the Paschal Candle
- Holy Father Urges Youth to Join ‘Revolution of Tenderness’
 
   
Media
- Tv Charity
- Radio Maria
- Radio Charity - Lebanon
 
Slide Shows & Movies
- Psalm 23
- Be United Against...
- You Are Mine
- Abortion
- Mother Teresa
- Promise
 
Calendar
  November 2019  
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Number Of Visitors:
480277
 
‘Only God Is Master of Life, Our Duty Is to Preserve It Always,’ Vatican Reacts to Vincent Lambert’s Death

July 11, 2019. ‘Doctors Should Serve Life, Not Take It Away,’ Pope Francis Had Tweeted

“We recall and reiterate what the Holy Father said, intervening on this painful one story: God is the only master of life from the beginning to its natural end and it is our duty to preserve it always and not give in to the culture of waste.”

Alessandro Gisotti, Director of the Holy See Press Office, underscored this in a statement he issued today, July 11, 2019, in response to the death of Vincent Lambert.
The statement, published in Italian and French, stated the following:
“We received the news of Vincent Lambert’s death with pain. We pray that
the Lord welcomes Him into His house and we express closeness to his loved ones and to those, up to the last minute, have been committed to assisting him with love and dedication.”
“We recall and reiterate what the Holy Father said, intervening on this painful one story: God is the only master of life from the beginning to its natural end and it is our duty to preserve it always and not give in to the culture of waste.”
Yesterday, Pope Francis tweeted: “We pray for the sick who are abandoned and left to die. A society is human if it protects life, every life, from its beginning to its natural end, without choosing who is worthy to live or who is not. Doctors should serve life, not take it away.”
The Vatican on May 21 called for protecting the life of Vincent Lambert, saying that “continued assistance” is an “inescapable duty” and doing otherwise is a “grave violation” of human dignity. This was conveyed in a joint declaration of the Dicastery for the Laity, Family and Life and the Pontifical Academy for Life on the case of Lambert, someone severely disabled in France where there is ethical debate about whether he should be allowed to die as a result of lack of food and water.

Reiterating that withdrawing nutrition and hydration would constitute a grave violation of human dignity, the Vatican noted that while “the “vegetative state” is certainly a burdensome pathological state,” it “however does not in any way compromise the dignity of those people who find themselves in this condition, nor does it compromise their fundamental rights to life and to care, understood as the continuity of basic human assistance.”

Nutrition and hydration, they explained, constitute a form of essential care, “always proportionate to life support.” To nourish a sick person, they continued, “never constitutes a form of unreasonable therapeutic obstinacy, as long as the person is able to receive nutrition and hydration, provided this does not cause intolerable suffering or prove damaging to the patient.”

Abandonment, Pitiless Judgment

“The suspension of such care represents, rather,” they decried, “a form of abandonment of the patient, based on a pitiless judgment of the quality of life, expression of a throwaway culture that selects the most fragile and helpless people, without recognizing their uniqueness and immense value.”

“The continuity of assistance,” they underscored, “is an inescapable duty.”

They expressed their hope “that solutions may be found as soon as possible to protect Mr. Lambert’s life,” and concluded expressing the prayer of the Holy Father and all the Church.

On May 20, Pope Francis tweeted: “We pray for those who live with severe illness. Let us always safeguard life, God’s gift, from its beginning until its natural end. Let us not give in to a throwaway culture.”

***

Joint Declaration of the Dicastery for the Laity, Family and Life and the Pontifical Academy for Life on the case of Mr. Vincent Lambert: In full agreement with the affirmations of the Archbishop of Reims, H.E. Msgr. Éric de Moulins-Beaufort, and the auxiliary bishop, H.E. Msgr. Bruno Feillet, in relation to the sad case of Mr. Vincent Lambert, we wish to reiterate the grave violation of the dignity of the person that the withdrawal of nutrition and hydration would constitute. Indeed, the “vegetative state” is certainly a burdensome pathological state, which however does not in any way compromise the dignity of those people who find themselves in this condition, nor does it compromise their fundamental rights to life and to care, understood as the continuity of basic human assistance.

Nutrition and hydration constitute a form of essential care, always proportionate to life support: to nourish a sick person never constitutes a form of unreasonable therapeutic obstinacy, as long as the person is able to receive nutrition and hydration, provided this does not cause intolerable suffering or prove damaging to the patient.

The suspension of such care represents, rather, a form of abandonment of the patient, based on a pitiless judgment of the quality of life, expression of a throwaway culture that selects the most fragile and helpless people, without recognizing their uniqueness and immense value. The continuity of assistance is an inescapable duty.

We therefore hope that solutions may be found as soon as possible to protect Mr. Lambert’s life. To this end, we assure the prayer of the Holy Father and all the Church.

[Vatican-provided statement]